Welcome to WalesRails

A survey of railways in Wales and the tourist attractions they serve

Thumbnail maps of Europe and Wales

Arriva Trains Wales

Region
North Wales
Mid Wales
South Wales

National Network

Route Sections

Gazetteer of Stations

About Wales

WHITLAND TO PEMBROKE DOCK

This is an extract from the page on Arriva Trains Wales. To access the main site select either the North Wales, The Marches, and Chepstow-Swansea section, the Heart of Wales, Swansea and West Wales section, or the full version which combines the two.
Select one of these links to return to the Gazetteer of Stations or Route Sections page.

Search WalesRails .......... Message Board

Preserved:
Standard gauge
Narrow gauge

WalesRails:
The Grand Tour

Official Websites

What's New

Back to Welcome page

Stations on this branch are part of the Greenway initiative supported by the South Pembrokeshire Action with Rural Communities (SPARC) forum, which seeks to encourage green tourism in this very green area of the Welsh countryside.
With the aim of persuading visitors to leave their cars at home and utilise public transport while holidaying in the area, packages are available which gives reduced travel to stations in South Pembrokeshire, and discounted accommodation which ranges from farmhouses, small guest houses or larger hotels.
Once in the area, there are further initiatives which enable visitors to explore the region by foot, bicycle (cycle hire is available) or by train or bus. There are a number of official cycleways, and a variety of walks of various lengths - such as the Landsker Borderland Trail, or the footpath to the coast from Penally station especially created for disabled visitors.
There is also a scheme whereby long-stay visitors can be collected from Whitland station, taken to their overnight accommodation and, in the morning, provided with bicycles or information about walking routes for them to complete the next of their journey. At the end of their week's or fortnight's holiday, they are again taken to the railway station for their journey home.
Details of the scheme are available from railway stations serving West Wales, or from SPARC at The Old School House, Station Road, Narberth, Pembs, SA67 8DU. Tel; +44 (01834) 860965

Whitland
is, today, a market town which thrives on agriculture and the dairy industry, but its place in history is assured thanks to the 10th century ruler of the district, Hywel Dda (in English, Howell the Good). During his reign Hywel succeeded in uniting the warring kingdoms of Wales, and, in the year 930 at an assembly of clergy and laymen held at Whitland, he codified the laws on which present-day democratic government is based. The town's memorial to Hywel takes the form of six small gardens which symbolise the six principles embodied in those laws.
The parish Church of St Mary dates from the early 18th century, but the site goes back to medieval times.
Whitland marks the eastern boundary of the Landsker: an imaginary border which historically separates the English-speaking south from the Welsh speaking north of Pembrokeshire. Leaving Whitland, the line divides, and trains for Pembroke Dock take the left-hand fork. From the train, the rural nature of the Landsker borderland (which separates the English-speaking south from the Welsh speaking north of Pembrokeshire) is self-evident.
Narberth
is the first stop. The Arberth of the Mabinogion - a collection of medieval Welsh folk tales and legends, where Pwyll, the prince of Dyfed met the hounds of the Underworld - which all adds spice to a walk in the hills around the town!
In the old guild hall there is a museum, part of which is devoted to the Mabinogion, and part to the Landsker. Three miles away is Oakwood Leisure Park, which includes Megafobia - Europe's largest wooden roller-coaster - and the death-defying Vertigo, a 120ft-high swing which reaches speeds of up to 60mph and is claimed to give the nearest sensation to flying it is possible to attain.
Nearby, the Canaston Centre 2000 offers hi-tech Crystal Maze-style adventures in a futuristic setting.
Kilgetty
was once at the heart of Pembrokeshire's coal mining district, but has long reverted to a more rural style.
From here, the railway moves closer to the coast, and the remaining stations on the branch are within walking distance of the Pembrokeshire Coastal Path, a 186-mile trail between Amroth and Cardigan with some of the country's most spectacular cliff-top scenery. In 2012, the path was incorporated into the Wales Coastal Path, which as it' name implies, provides a walking route around the entire coast of Wales.
Saundersfoot
station is set some way inland from the beach and harbour, surrounded by high cliffs which give a strenuous but stunning walk along a section of the path to...
...Tenby
the principal seaside resort of Pembrokeshire, which can trace its history back to the Viking invasion, though its popularity with holiday-makers dates only to the arrival of the railway in 1860. St Mary's Church and the Merchant's House on Quay hill are both medieval, while the ruin of the Norman castle overlooks the harbour, which, like that at Saundersfoot, featured in the county's coal export trade.
Tenby boasts two beaches. Goscar Rock rises from the sands of North beach which has the picturesque harbour at its eastern tip, while South Beach is dominated by St Catherine's Rock, accessible at low tide, which is topped by a deserted fort (no longer open to the public).
Penally
is reached after the railway has snaked across the golf course. The village has a 13th-century Church dedicated to Saint Teilo whose bones it is reputedly said to house, in the churchyard of which is a carved Celtic cross.
Manorbier
has a castle which dates from the reign of Henry I, and was the birthplace of the medieval historian Geraldis Cambrensis, famed for his account of a journey through Wales in 1188 by Baldwin, Archbishop of Canterbury on a recruiting campaign for the Third Crusade. The village also has a church of the same period as the castle.
The Bishop's Palace at LampheyLamphey
has the ruins of the Bishop of St David's Palace (left), built in the early decades of the 14th century.
Pembroke
is dominated by the partially restored castle which is given further dramatic eminence by its position atop a limestone crag. It was started around 1090, by one of the Marcher Lords of Shrewsbury, and in places its walls are 20ft thick. At high tide, it is surrounded by the sea on three sides, and on the landward side it is protected by a ditch, but during the English Civil War its invincibility was breached when a traitor revealed the castle's water supply to Cromwell's troops, who laid the castle to siege and ruin.
From Pembroke, the line tunnels under Bush Hill, before emerging to arrive at
Pembroke Dock
station, close to the ferry terminal for Rosslare in the Republic of Ireland.

This is an extract from the page on the Arriva Trains Wales.
To access the main site select either the North Wales, The Marches, and Chepstow-Swansea section, the Heart of Wales, Swansea and West Wales section, or the full version which combines the two.
Select one of these links to return to the Gazetteer of Stations or Route Sections page.

Return to top of Page

Copyright 1998/9/2000/1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/10/11 /12/13/14 by Deryck Lewis. All rights reserved.
Page created January 28 1998; Redesigned March 29 1999; Updated
May 18 2014
If you have any suggestions, comments, or glitches to report, please contact the author at WalesRails