Welcome to WalesRails

A survey of railways in Wales and the tourist attractions they serve

Thumbnail maps of Europe and Wales

Arriva Trains Wales

Region
North Wales
Mid Wales
South Wales

National Network

Route Sections

Gazetteer of Stations

About Wales

WHITLAND TO
MILFORD HAVEN/FISHGUARD

This is an extract from the page on Arriva Trains Wales.
To access the main site select either the North Wales, The Marches, and Chepstow-Swansea section, the Heart of Wales, Swansea and West Wales section, or the full version which combines the two.
Select one of these links to return to the Gazetteer of Stations or Route Sections page.

Search WalesRails .......... Message Board

Preserved:
Standard gauge
Narrow gauge

WalesRails:
The Grand Tour

Official Websites

What's New

Back to Welcome page

Whitland
is, today, a market town which thrives on agriculture and the dairy industry, but its place in history is assured thanks to the 10th century ruler of the district, Hywel Dda (in English, Howell the Good). During his reign Hywel succeeded in uniting the warring kingdoms of Wales, and, in the year 930 at an assembly of clergy and laymen held at Whitland, he codified the laws on which present-day democratic government is based. The town's memorial to Hywel takes the form of six small gardens which symbolise the six principles embodied in those laws.
The parish Church of St Mary dates from the early 18th century, but the site goes back to medieval times.
Whitland marks the eastern boundary of the Landsker: an imaginary border which historically separates the English-speaking south from the Welsh speaking north of Pembrokeshire.

Clunderwen
In early railway parlance, a 'Road' suffix in the name usually meant that the station was nowhere near the place-name mentioned. This was the early fate of Clunderwen, which was known as Narberth Road until Narberth, three miles away, got its own station. Although the name (of a local mansion house) Clunderwen dates back to early 17th century, the village developed around the railway station which opened in 1854, and was, for a time, a busy station serving the local agricultural community, despatching farm produce to the rest of the country. St David's Church was built in 1860, to replace the ancient chapel at Castell Dwyran, some distance outside the village.
Clarbeston Road
Set a short distance from the cluster of houses and a public house which form the village, the station is close to the railway junction where the track divides for Milford Haven or Fishguard, the route to Milford Haven curving off to the left.
Haverfordwest
is built around a steep hill topped by a 12th century fortress, on the bank of the Western Cleddau River. St Mary's church was rebuilt in the 13th century on the site of its Norman predecessor, and is an imposing structure with oak-beamed roof and an effigy of a pilgrim in the nave.
Johnston
serves a residential community surrounded by farms and rural villages.
Milford Haven
was founded by in 1792 by Quaker whalers from America: the Friends meeting house still stands in Priory Road, surrounded by the burial ground in which some of the reverse-émigrés are buried. In Welsh, Milford is known as Aberdaugleddau (mouth of the two Cleddau) from its location on the estuary of the Eastern Cleddau and Western Cleddau rivers. Since its early fishing days, the port has been involved with shipbuilding, Lord Nelson and Lady Hamilton, and more recently, oil refining. The oil refineries put paid to much of the fishing industry, and the harbour has been turned into a marina. Lord Nelson laid one of the foundation stones of St Katherine's Church which was built in 1808.

Back at Clarbeston Road, it's straight ahead for

Fishguard and Goodwick 15 miles away without any stops.
One of the latest network stations to come on-line, it opened on May 14th 2012 to serve local communities and give residents access to train services without a difficult journey to Fishguard Harbour.
Fishguard,
Today, Fishguard is a ferry port for Ireland, but is noted for being the location of the last foreign invasion of Britain. On February 22 1797, French troops fleeing the Revolution landed at Fishguard, probably thinking in error that they had reached Ireland. They were repulsed by the ladies of the port - led by the formidable Jemima Nicholas, wife of the local cobbler - armed with pitchforks; the Frenchmen surrendering without a fight after mistaking the women's traditional Welsh costumes for infantrymen's uniform.
The port's massive breakwater extends over half-a-mile out to sea, and 800 tons of rock was needed for each foot of its length.
The village of Fishguard is very picturesque, and parts of the big screen versions of Moby Dick and Under Milk Wood,with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, were filmed here.

This is an extract from the page on the Arriva Trains Wales. To access the main site select either the North Wales, The Marches, and Chepstow-Swansea section, the Heart of Wales, Swansea and West Wales section, or the full version which combines the two.
Select one of these links to return to the Gazetteer of Stations or Route Sections page.

Return to top of Page

Copyright © 1998/9/2000/1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/10/11/12 by Deryck Lewis. All rights reserved.
Page created January 28 1998; Redesigned March 29 1999; Updated May 18 2014
If you have any suggestions, comments, or glitches to report, please contact the author at WalesRails