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Shrewsbury
to
Aberystwyth/Pwllheli.


Trains from Birmingham run through to Aberystwyth; passengers for stations to Pwllheli change at Machynlleth, but in the return direction, one train per weekday runs direct from Pwllheli to Shrewsbury. There are also peak time local services to/from Aberystwyth and Machynlleth, connecting with trains on the coastal route.

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A Central Trains Class 156 train at Machynlleth

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For gazetteer information of places in Mid Wales served by Arriva Trains Wales , select:
Shrewsbury to Aberystwyth
Machynlleth to Barmouth
Barmouth to Pwllheli

Preserved railways served by Arriva Trains Wales

(Pictured above) A Sprinter service at Machynlleth with the Pwllheli section departing in the distance

Please Note

Stations served by Arriva Trains Wales

Shrewsbury to Aberystwyth

Please note. The period of validity of the National Network timetables has changed.
Any times and travel details given  apply only for the currency of the timetable valid from May 18 to December 13 2014.

From Aberystwyth
Mondays to Saturdays
, trains for Shrewsbury leave at 5.14am, then two-hourly between 7.30am and 7.30 pm. There are also trains calling at all stations to Machynlleth only at 9.36pm and 11.53pm (On Saturdays 11.46pm).
Sundays, trains for Shrewsbury are two-hourly between 9.30am and 7.30 pm. There are also trains calling at all stations to Machynlleth only at 9.36pm and 11.30pm.

From Shrewsbury
Mondays to Fridays,
trains for Aberystwyth leave two-hourly between 7.27am and 5.27pm, and at 7.30pm and 9.42. There are also trains starting from Machynlleth at 4.35am, 6.35am and 8.07am.
Saturdays, trains for Aberystwyth leave two-hourly between 7.27am and 5.27pm, and at 7.30pm and 9.42. There are also trains starting from Machynlleth at 4.35am and 6.35am.
Sundays, trains for Aberystwyth leave at 8.45am, 1.27pm, 3.27pm, 5.27pm, 7.27pm and 9.30pm. There are also trains starting from Machynlleth at 8.50am and 10.50am.

Shrewsbury (105 mins) is, perhaps, the best-preserved medieval town in England, but has a history which dates back to the 6th century BC. Set on rising ground in an almost-complete loop of the River Severn, two reminders of its role as a border town between England and Wales are the Welsh Bridge and the English Bridge across the river's western and eastern loops, respectively. The castle - located close to the station - has Norman, Edwardian and Civil War connections, with a tower added by Telford, the 18th century engineer and architect better known for his work with roads, canals and railways. The Abbey was founded in 1083, while St Alkmund and St Mary's churches both date from Saxon times. The civic church of Shrewsbury, however, is St Chad's, though all of the churches are noted for stained and painted glass windows.
Many old half-timbered buildings remain. The site of the Battle of Shrewsbury - between Henry IV and the rebellious Sir Henry Percy (the Harry Hotspur of Shakespeare's play) - lies three miles to the north.
Welshpool 22 (84) mins
This Severn Valley market town boasts not only two railway stations, but a canal as well. The network railway station is set amid a complex road network, but a few hundred yards away is the town proper which still retains an nineteenth century air.
Prominent is the Powysland Museum, and the restored church dating from the 6th century, outside which is a wishing stone. Make your wish while turning three times on the stone, and all is said to come true. Follow the sound of train whistles and the smell of steam, and you are at the Welshpool and Llanfair Caereinon Railway. The Museum itself stands on wharf of the Llangollen Canal, with boat cruises or boats for hire.
A mile from the town is Powys Castle, a red stone mansion on the site of a 13th century fortress, set in terraced gardens which provide excellent views of the surrounding countryside. They are renowned for their topiary and spectacular fireworks and outdoor concerts during the summer months.
Inside, the Clive Museum - named after the son of Clive of India - contains a wealth of material appertaining to the British Raj.
Newtown 38 (68) mins
The town is a mix of country market and industrial centre. There are several striking buildings in the wide main street, including St David's church which dates from the 1840s. The charter for the market was granted by the Marcher Lord Roger Mortimer in 1279, but it is for its textile industry that it is most famous. It is also the birthplace of socialist pioneer, Robert Owen, who, while manager at the New Lanark Mills in Scotland (1800 - 1825), improved the lot of his workers by creating a model village, introducing better working conditions, improved housing and facilities for education. He was behind several attempts to set up other international co-operatives, including one at New Harmony, Indiana. There is a museum dedicated to him, and his grave is in the churchyard of ruined St Mary's Church which dates from the 13th century, but fell into disuse in the mid-1800s after repeated flooding by the River Severn, on whose banks it stands.
Caersws 45 (58) mins
The remains of the Roman fort to which the town owes its origin can still be traced; it was here that the Briton King Caratacus (to the Welsh, Caradog) is said to have fought his last battle before being captured by the Romans and taken to Rome. Rally driving takes place in the forests around the town, and at nearby Carno, the Forest Experience gives drivers a chance to try their hand at the sport.
Machynlleth 78 (30) mins
The interchange for connections to stations between Machynlleth and Barmouth and on to Pwllheli.
To the Romans it was Maglona, but there is evidence of a settlement here during the Iron Age (700 - 150 BC). More recently, Machynlleth was chosen as the capital of Wales by Owain Glyndwr, who was proclaimed Prince of Wales in 1404. His Parliament House is now a museum and cultural centre. The ornate Victorian Clock Tower which dominates one end of the main street (Maengwyn), dates from 1873. Maengwyn is also the location for the market and a number of fairs held throughout the year. Throughout the town there is ample evidence of the importance of the slate industry to the region's economy in the use of the material not only for roofs, but walls and fences as well.
The town is also at the heart of the tourist area described in the Green Guide to the Dyfi Valley. This is available from the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), which specialises in developing environmentally friendly projects with working demonstrations of renewable sources of energy. At CAT - located 2 miles north of the town - there is a water powered cliff railway, and a fully-organic garden which even finds use for waste products from the toilets. A similar distance in the opposite direction is Ynys Hir nature reserve, while at Penegoes, two miles to the east, is Felin Crewi Mill and Cafe - a working 16th century watermill where freshly-milled flour and muesli is for sale, or used in the food served in the cafe.
Dovey Junction 90 (23) mins
On the marshy upper reaches of the River Dovey estuary, a rewarding location for bird watching. There is a camping and caravan park 1km to the north-east.
Borth 100 (10) mins
A single street of cottages facing the sea, Borth retains the character of a fishing village, despite the proliferation of caravan parks in the fields beyond. At the north end of the sandy beach there is a Youth Hostel, and beyond that the southern shore of the Dovey Estuary, which includes Ynys Las nature reserve.
Aberystwyth 110 mins
Not only a popular holiday resort, Aberystwyth is also one of the most important cultural centres in Wales. Here the first university in the principality was established in 1896, and fifteen years later the first phase of the National Library of Wales was opened in a former hotel. Designed and built in 1860 by railway engineer Thomas Savin for a hoped-for influx of tourists which took some time to materialise, the Gothic building is a striking feature of the promenade.
But the history of the town goes back much further. Atop Pen Dinas, south of the town, is one of the largest Iron Age forts in West Wales, its site now marked by a relic of a relatively modern conflict: an upturned cannon from the Battle of Waterloo.
Until the coming of the railway, Aberystwyth was an important port on the Cambrian coastline. The harbour and pier are now put to pleasure use.
The view to the north is dominated by 485ft Constitution Hill, which has a funicular railway that hauls visitors up a 2-in-1 incline for some of the most spectacular views of Cardigan Bay.
Adjoining the station is the terminus of the Vale Of Rheidol narrow gauge railway which offers an 11-mile trip to Devil's Bridge.

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Machynlleth to Barmouth

Please note. The period of validity of the National Network timetables has changed.
Any times and travel details given  apply only for the currency of the timetable valid from May 18 2014 to December 13 2014.

From Machynlleth, Monday to Saturday services to Pwllheli run at 5.07am (does not call at all stations), 6.47am, 8.57am, 10.55am, 12.55pm, 2.56pm, 5.05pm,  6.59pm (runs Fridays only to Barmouth) and 9.20pm.
On Sundays,
there are services at 10.10am, 3.00pm and 6.55pm.

From Pwllheli, Monday to Saturday services to Machynlleth run at 6.46am (starts at Barmouth), 6.29am, 7.24am, 9.34am, 11.37am, 1.38pm, 3.37pm, 5.45pm and 8.05pm.
On Sundays, there are services at 11.28am, 1.48pm and 5.36pm.

Figures after station names show approximate journey times from Machynlleth, with approximate journey times from Barmouth in brackets.
Station names in italics are request stops only.

Machynlleth (52 mins)
The interchange for connections to stations between Shrewsbury and Aberystwyth.
To the Romans it was Maglona, but there is evidence of a settlement here during the Iron Age (700 - 150 BC). Somewhat more recently, Machynlleth was chosen as the capital of Wales by Owain Glyndwr, who was proclaimed Prince of Wales in 1404. His Parliament House is now a museum and cultural centre. The ornate Victorian Clock Tower which dominates one end of the main street (Maengwyn), dates from 1873. Maengwyn is also the location for the weekly market and a number of fairs held throughout the year. Throughout the town there is ample evidence of the importance of the slate industry to the region's economy in the use of the material not only for roofs, but walls and fences as well.
The town is also at the heart of the tourist area described in the Green Guide to the Dyfi Valley. This is available from the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), which specialises in developing environmentally friendly projects with working demonstrations of renewable sources of energy. At CAT - located 2 miles north of the town - there is a water powered cliff railway, and a fully-organic garden which even finds use for waste products from the toilets. A similar distance in the opposite direction is Ynys Hir nature reserve, while at Penegoes, two miles to the east, is Felin Crewi Mill and Cafe - a working 16th century watermill where freshly-milled flour and muesli is for sale, and used to prepare the food served in the cafe.
Dovey Junction 6 mins (44)
On the marshy upper reaches of the River Dovey estuary, a rewarding location for bird watching. There is a camping and caravan park 1km to the north-east.
Penhelig 15 mins (35)
station serves the small village a little further down the estuary.
Aberdovey 18 mins (22)
Noted as a base for sailing and fishing, it has an inshore rescue station and an Outward Bound Sailing museum. Historically, its claim to fame is based on the fact that, in 1216, Llywellyn the Great held the first Welsh Parliament here. More recently, the Victorian composer Charles Dibdin wrote a song about a mysterious sunken city offshore from where, legend has it, the bells of the church can be heard as they are tolled by the sea currents.
The Talyllyn Railway at BrynglasTywyn 26 mins (24)
Tywyn is a seaside resort, despite being largely almost a mile inland. Its Norman church has been much restored, and houses the Stone of Cadfan, dating from the 6th century and the oldest inscribed in the Welsh language.
A quarter-mile from the network station is the Tywyn Wharf terminus of the Talyllyn Railway (left), the first railway to be preserved by volunteers, thanks to whom it has remained in continuous operation for over 130 years, and was the inspiration for the film: The Titfield Thunderbolt. Adjoining Wharf station, the Narrow Gauge Railway Museum has a number of locomotives and other relics from this and other railways in the UK.
Tonfanau 30 mins (20)
Llwyngwril 36 mins (14)
Serving a coastal village with a population of around 500 which has strong links with the early days of the Society of Friends movement; the Quaker burial ground carries the date 1646.  Castell-y-Gaer is a prehistoric hill fort overlooking the village and there are also many standing stones in the area.  There is a local legend that these originate from the time when the lowland giant Gwril and his cousin, the mountain giant Idris (sitting on nearby 2,923' Cader Idris), used to throw rocks at each other. No such danger today, however, just peaceful holiday cottages at Pentre Bach close to the centre of town and caravan parks a short distance from the station.
Fairbourne 43 mins (7)
The resort owes its existence to flour, for it was developed by the self-raising flour mogul Sir Arthur MacDougall. It is the terminus of the Fairbourne and Barmouth Railway, which runs two miles to Porth Penrhyn where it links to the ferry across the River Mawddach.
Morfa Mawddach 45 mins (5)
is at the south-eastern end of the 800-yard long toll footbridge across the River Mawddach estuary
Barmouth
50 mins
where the station building has reopened as a tourist information centre.
There is a lifeboat museum and leisure centre, and also the 800-yards-long toll footbridge which shares the railway crossing to Morfa Mawddach.

For an exhilarating half-day's pleasure with stunning views of sea- and mountainscape: walk to Morfa Mawddach along the toll footbridge, a mostly timber structure of 113 spans plus two steel spans over the bed of the river, (if you encounter a train during the crossing - don't worry, the bridge always vibrates!). From Morfa Mawddach, walk, or take the train, to Fairbourne, then take the Fairbourne and Barmouth miniature railway to Porth Penrhyn to join the ferry back to Barmouth. The walk can be joined at any intermediate point, or taken in any direction.

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Barmouth to Pwllheli

Barmouth (72)
See previous section Machynlleth to Barmouth.
Llanaber
3 mins (69)
is the location of the parish church of Barmouth which dates from the year 1200, and is a fine example of early-English architecture, unaltered to the present-day. It contains a stone slab, once used to cross a stream, bearing the Latin inscription coelextus monedeo regi which still puzzles scholars trying to find out to whom or what it refers.
From Llanaber until Llansarn, the railway, which until now has never been far from the sea, gradually moves inland. The next station is
Talybont 7 mins (65)
One of several Tal-y-bonts (in English, End of the Bridge) scattered throughout Wales, this one has a Country Life museum and a number of camping and caravanning sites.
Dyffryn Ardudwy 9 mins (63)
The church at Llanddwywe has the grave of Oliver Cromwell's brother-in-law who was beheaded for conspiring to kill King Charles I. South of the village are two Neolithic burial sites.
Llanbedr 12 mins (60) is noted for its trout fishing. The harbour is protected by Y Mochras, or Shell Island, with countless varieties of seashell. It may be reached by a causeway at low tide. The church of Saint Peter has a unique Bronze Age stone, and a 17th century slate slab inscribed with a warning, in Welsh, that no-one should enter the house of God unless he is pure of mind. Maes Artro village is a former air base which has been converted into a living museum, depicting the airfield's role in World War II, including a strategically placed Spitfire aircraft, and a village shop stocked with war-time provisions.
Pensarn 14 mins (58) faces Llanbedr across the somewhat muddy estuary of the River Artro.
Llandanwg 15 mins (57)
St Tanwg's church lies among the sand dunes, and is of great antiquity. Stones dating from the 5th century have been found here, together with some spirally-carved specimens which have been traced back to the early-Bronze Age in Britain (c2350-1500 BC)
Harlech CastleHarlech 21 mins (51)
Formerly the county town of Merionethshire, its formidable castle (left) stands on a rocky outcrop between the sea and the mountains of Snowdonia.
Built by Edward 1 in 1283, it featured prominently in subsequent military campaigns until the Commonwealth, but it was during the War of the Roses that, it is claimed, the fortification became the inspiration for the well-known battle song Men of Harlech. Coleg Harlech houses Theatre Ardudwy, which puts on plays films and concerts.
Royal St David's Golf Course is half-mile south of the station.
Tygwyn
30 mins (42)
At low tide there is a treacherous walk across the salt marshes to Gifftan Island in the estuary.
Talsarnau 32 mins (40)
Llandecwyn 34 mins (38)
In the hills behind the village lies Llyn Tecwyn, a reservoir a half-mile in length with, it is claimed, the best trout fishing in Wales. The grave of a 17th century suspected witch who was rolled down the mountain in a spiked barrel is marked by a quartz slab, placed to prevent her ghost from haunting the village.
Penrhyndaudraeth 37 mins (35)
West of the town is the village of Port Meirion. Created piecemeal between 1927 and 1972 by Sir Clough Williams-Ellis, the Italiannate fantasy world village of pink, blue and white wash buildings in a mix of architectural styles, has been used as location for many films and TV dramas, most famously for the cult series of the 1960s, The Prisoner which starred Patrick McGoohan. Fans of the series visit the village to re-enact their favourite episodes. Noel Coward wrote his play Blithe Spirit while staying at Port Meirion.
Minffordd 41 mins (31)
This is the most convenient interchange station with the Ffestiniog Railway which runs to Blaenau Ffestiniog where it links with the network service along the Conway Valley between Blaenau Ffestiniog and Llandudno.
Porthmadog 46 mins (26)
The harbour and its mile-long embankment of reclaimed land was built in the early years of the 19th century by Member of Parliament Arthur Maddocks, who gave the Welsh version of his name to the project in honour of 12th century Welsh Prince Madoc who is reputed to have sailed from a cove hereabouts and to have discovered America. Maddocks also built the adjoining town of Tremadog, modelled on a Regency-style townscape, where Shelley wrote his visionary poem Queen Mab in 1812/3. Tremadog was the birthplace of T. E. Lawrence (of Arabia) and Liberal Prime Minister David Lloyd-George started his career as a solicitor in the town. It is the terminus for the Ffestiniog and the Welsh Highland railways.
Criccieth 54 mins (18)
The castle stands on a rocky outcrop 400 metres from the station. Two miles away is Llandystumdwy, the birthplace of Welsh statesman David Lloyd-George. There is a memorial to him on the banks of the River Dwyfor.
Penychain 59 mins (13) serves the Haven Holidays camp, which has been redesigned with caravan accommodation rather than traditional chalets.
Abererch 62 mins (10)
The station is a short distance from the picturesque village, which is worth a visit for the medieval church and red and white Ebenezer chapel.
Pwllheli 72 mins
Although it was first mooted as a tourist resort in the 1820s, it was only the existence of its harbour and ship-building trade which encouraged the Cambrian Railway to choose Pwllheli as the terminus of its line which brought the first holidaymakers. Its history goes back even further and was granted a charter to hold a weekly market by Edward, the Black Prince.
Beyond - though, sadly, not served by train - are the many delights of the Lleyn peninsular which points across the sea to Ireland, and offers breathtaking seascapes, sandy bays and fishing villages set against the rugged grandeur of the mountains of Snowdonia.

Preserved Railways served by Arriva Trains Wales

Fairbourne and Barmouth Railway
The terminus is close to Fairbourne station; and the railway can be part of an exhilarating circular walk using the ferry and the station at Morfa Mawddach.
Ffestiniog Railway
Minffordd is the most convenient interchange station with Arriva Trains Wales services, but there is also access at Porthmadog, where the stations are about a half-mile apart.
Talyllyn Railway
The Talyllyn's terminus is about a half-mile from Arriva Trains Wales station at Tywyn. Turn right outside the station and follow the signs.
Vale of Rheidol Railway
The terminus station is adjacent to the Arriva Trains Wales station at Aberystwyth.
Welsh Highland Railway
The terminus station is adjacent to the Arriva Trains Wales station at Porthmadog.
Welshpool and Llanfair Railway
The preserved railway's terminus is in Raven Square, which is signposted and is about a mile from the Arriva Trains Wales station at Welshpool.

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Copyright 1996/7/8/9/2000/1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/10/11 /12/13/14 by Deryck Lewis. All rights reserved.
Page created July 15 1996; Redesigned March 29 1999; Last updated May 18 2014
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